You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘castrated’ tag.

I’d like you to meet my buddy, Opie.  Opie is a wether (castrated ram) who lives at New Moon Farm Goat Rescue & Sanctuary.

When I volunteer at the rescue on Fridays, Opie is usually eager to rub his head against my thigh for as long as I’ll let him.  This is okay when I wear pants, but in the summer I have to tell him no.  His wool is just too abrasive against bare legs!

Like the ocean– I’ve learned to “never turn my back” on Opie.  If I do, he’ll run up and try to butt me in the rear.  If I do turn my back– and then see him running toward me– all I have to do is turn around and put my hand out.  He stops right in his tracks!  Opie could do some damage to me if he wanted, but the truth is, he’s just a lover.  Enjoy these pictures of my fluffy friend.

Eric with Emmett & Opie – 3/19/10

Elisa & Opie – 3/19/10

Opie – 3/16/12

Elisa & Opie – 3/16/12

Such a sweet guy!

My friend.

Opie running toward me!

Acting tough!

Opie is a sentient being– just like me and just like you.

Opie with his full winter coat – 3/23/12

6/14/12 – He’s so handsome when he gets a haircut. And so skinny!

Lazy summer days – 8/03/12

Elisa & Opie – 8/10/12

Opie is safe, but too many of his brothers and sisters are not.  Here are some ways that you can help:

  1. Don’t eat sheep (lamb, mutton).
  2. Don’t eat cheese made from sheep’s milk.
  3. Don’t buy items made from wool.  Learn more about the wool industry.
  4. Don’t buy personal care products that contain lanolin.  Don’t buy products tested on animals.
  5. Learn about vegan sources of Vitamin D (that don’t contain lanolin).  Buy Vitashine Vegan Vitamin D3 or Global Health Trax Plant Based Vitamin D3.
  6. Go VEGAN.

I did a home safety assessment for a patient at work today.  I went with her & her husband to their rural home that includes a small herd (i.e. <25) of cows raised for meat.  Having never been in this particular situation before, I was keenly interested to learn everything I could about the fate of those animals.  I watched the cows innocently & peacefully grazing on grass as my patient was more than happy to answer all my questions.

By anyone’s definition, this is about as “humane” as an animal farm can get.  The bulls are not castrated, so the breeding is natural.  The cows have a lovely green pasture with a beautiful view of trees & mountains in a location w/ a mild climate.  A mobile unit comes to the farm to slaughter the animals on site.  The animals are killed when not much more than ~18 months (“so that the meat doesn’t get too tough”…and older animals are only “good” for hamburger.)  The animal’s body is hauled off to a butcher shop in a nearby city for about a week of aging (she called it “hanging”) & then processing into the various meat cuts.

This will be the last herd that my patient & her husband will have because they are both elderly & it’s getting to be too much work for them.  She also admitted that for health reasons everyone in her family is eating less beef so it is clearly not a necessary food source.  She clearly has a certain fondness for her animals & yet her speaking tone was matter of fact and clinical.

I found the whole experience quite unsettling.  Since going vegan, I have never needed confirmation, but yet being there confirmed in my mind that I am on the right track.  If this little family farm is AS good as it gets, I still don’t want any part of it.  I looked at the eyes of those animals.  I put myself in their situation.  I can only come to the conclusion that those animals don’t deserve to be suddenly killed when it is so unnecessary to kill them.  It is unnecessary to eat them.  And they really are babies…18 months.  Cows can live to be 20 years or more if given the chance.

More Q’s I have:  What happens when the mobile slaughter unit drives up?  What is the process then?  I didn’t have time to find out all the answers to every question that I later thought of.  What happens when one cow is harmed..killed?  When do the other cows know that they, too, will be harmed?  I still want to know more.  Nevertheless, I reflect on this interaction without tears, without anger.  I am disturbed by it because it is so unfair.  So unjust.  But I am glad that no more animals on this particular farm will be bred just to be killed.  I hope that more people will go vegan.

(Written April 5, 2012)

"There are those who are appalled because I am so vocal about injustice, yet I am equally appalled by their silence." Lujene Clark

“Every time you purchase animal products you pay assassins to murder sentient beings for you.”

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 3,973 other followers

"My purpose is not to offend you, it is to provoke you to think." Unknown

Categories

My Last 50 Blog Posts

Archives

October 2019
S M T W T F S
« Sep    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

%d bloggers like this: