You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘milk’ tag.

This was my first attempt at making a NSNG (No Sugar No Grains) and GF (Gluten Free) “cookie,” and also my first time using coconut flour.  I’ve got to say– I did pretty good!  The only thing “bad” about these is they are too small!  After they came out of the oven, I ate about 5 very quickly.

The hazelnut flavor really comes through in these moist little snack cakes.  The coconut ingredients add both richness and texture.  The fruits and carrot impart a subtle sweetness.

In this recipe, I used just 2 dates to bump up the sweet just a bit.  That works out to about 0.053 dates per cake, or about a quarter of 1 date per 5 cakes.  Not bad at all!

These hold together quite well, so I predict they’re going to be tucked into my ski jacket pocket this winter.  I can’t wait for the flakes to start flying!

Coco-Hazelnut Snack Cakes (NSNG)

Coco-Hazelnut Snack Cakes (NSNG)

INGREDIENTS

3/4 C hazelnut flour (raw nuts ground in the Vitamix blender)
1/4 C garbanzo bean flour
1/4 C coconut flour
1/4 C ground flax seeds
1/4 C finely shredded unsweetened coconut
1 1/2 t cinnamon
1 t baking powder
1/4 t salt
1/4 t allspice

1/2 C full fat canned coconut milk
1/4 C unsweetened soy milk (or other non-dairy milk)
1 t vanilla extract
2 Medjool dates, pitted

1 C shredded carrot
1 C shredded organic apple (about 1 large)

ASSEMBLY

1.  Combine the dry ingredients in a large bowl.

2.  Blend the wet ingredients (i.e. milks, vanilla and pitted dates).

3.  Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients.  Stir in the carrot and apple.

4.  Use a cookie scoop (or 2 spoons) to drop batter balls onto a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper.  Flatten each ball and smooth the sides.  Note that these retain their form/size during baking.

Coco-Hazelnut Snack Cakes (before baking)

Coco-Hazelnut Snack Cakes (before baking)

5.  Bake at 400 degrees for about 15 minutes.  Cool on a wire rack.  Makes 38 or approximately 3 dozen.  Freeze what you’re not going to eat right away.

Happy Fall…Enjoy!

Sunflower in a pumpkin patch - Hood River, Oregon

Sunflower in a pumpkin patch – Hood River, Oregon

Crippled Goat - photo-7

Friday May 17, 2013

I’m holding a 3 day old baby goat.  He’s absolutely precious!  His cry is adorable.  Of course, I’m stating the obvious.  All babies are cute.

This little guy should be running and jumping and acting hilarious, like normal kids do.  But, he’s not doing that because he has 4 deformed legs that won’t even hold the weight of his tiny body.  He’s going to need a LOT of help.  He still might not make it.

Sadly, babies are born deformed.  It happens all the time.  Life isn’t fair.  In his case, he had 3 other siblings.  He was just so cramped in the womb that he didn’t develop normally.

Here’s the problem, though…

This kid is the product of a goat breeder.  It just so happens that the breeder is a “first time” breeder, but that doesn’t really matter.  A breeder is a breeder.  I’m talking about the dairy industry.

As I already mentioned, the mother goat who delivered this kid had 3 other babies.  The breeder didn’t think this one would live.  She focused her energy on the other three.

A day or two later, the breeder realized that this kid was still alive.  He wasn’t going to just die.

Now what?

The breeder doesn’t have time for bottle feeding.  This kid needs bottle feeding every 2-3 hours for at least a week.

The breeder can’t be bothered with a crippled goat.  This kid is completely dependent in every way.

What to do?  Of course:  Call a goat rescue.

Yes, that’s a very good thing to do.  I give her that.  It’s very good that she sought help.  She did the right thing by calling someone who cares about animals, and who has the experience to help.

But here’s the thing…

This kind of passing the buck (no pun intended) is completely unfair to the goat sanctuary owner.  I think it really “stinks” that breeders can basically dump their little inconveniences onto the people who run sanctuaries.

I wonder if the breeder offered to pay for any of the costs that the sanctuary owner will obviously incur, to take care of this kid.

What I just described is just one of the many problems I have with small dairy farms.

But, in general, I can’t stomach the dairy industry on any level.

I can’t stomach dairy products because I can’t accept the mentality that it’s okay to bring life into this world just to turn around and take it away.

Dairy breeders for all species (i.e. goats, sheep, cows) depend on continuous pregnancies to keep all that milk flowing.

Dairy breeders on farms of all sizes are in the business of killing unwanted baby animals.  This is simply the only way a dairy can make any money.  Extra bodies that aren’t producing milk are a drain on the business.  There are too many mouths to feed!

  • Male babies are killed because they won’t ever produce milk.
  • Female babies are killed because their numbers still inevitably become too numerous on the dairy farm.  Farms only need a small number of “replacements” for their “old” and “unproductive” mothers.  (Retirement = Death).

It’s really quite rare for a baby animal to get the kind of chance that the kid I’m holding in the picture is getting.  But, that certainly doesn’t make it okay to continue breeding animals.

Dairy really does make me sick to my stomach.

————————————–

Updates here…

"There are those who are appalled because I am so vocal about injustice, yet I am equally appalled by their silence." Lujene Clark

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 3,924 other followers

"My purpose is not to offend you, it is to provoke you to think." Unknown

Categories

My Last 50 Blog Posts

Archives

August 2017
S M T W T F S
« Jul    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Blog Stats

  • 153,563 hits
%d bloggers like this: